1619

  • In February, Louis’ younger sister Christine Marie marries the prince of Piedmont, heir to the duchy of Savoy. The queen mother is furious over the marriage, in no small part due to her own near-complete lack of involvement in the planning.
  • Less than two weeks after the wedding of Christine Marie, Marie de’ Medici escapes Blois with the help of agents of the duc d’Épernon, sneaking from an upper window of the château at Blois by way of a rickety ladder in the night. The queen mother flees to Angoulême, a fortress controlled by Épernon in a friendly province, making both Marie and the duke safe from immediate retribution.
  • The king mobilizes his household corps and advances on Angoulême while Luynes prepares to negotiate with the queen mother by summoning the bishop of Luçon back from Avignon. By September this ‘War of the Mother and Son’ is resolved without bloodshed: the king and the queen mother are reconciled amidst the applause of the courtiers, Marie receives the governorship of Anjou, and Épernon and his allies are protected from the king’s retribution; Luçon remains as an advisor to the queen mother. However, Marie is not permitted a seat on the king’s counsel nor is she allowed to return to court.
  • The prince de Condé is released from the royal fortress and prison of Vincennes, cleared of all wrong-doing by claims of false imprisonment by the traitor Ancre. This serves to further embarass the queen mother. In response her agents publish pamphlets smearing Luynes, head of the king’s council, claiming that Luynes is manipulating the king for his own advancement and that of his allies, pointing to the wealth and offices obtained by the king’s counsellor, foremost among them the title of duke and peer and the governorship of Picardy as well as his wife‘s position as superintendent of the queen consort’s household.


1619

Le Ballet de l'Acier Black_Vulmea